Why wasn't genocide a crime in Australia? Accounting for the half century delay in Australia implementing the Genocide Convention

@article{Scott2004WhyWG,
  title={Why wasn't genocide a crime in Australia? Accounting for the half century delay in Australia implementing the Genocide Convention},
  author={Shirley V. Scott},
  journal={Australian Journal of Human Rights},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={159 - 178}
}
  • S. Scott
  • Published 2004
  • Political Science
  • Australian Journal of Human Rights
Australia ratified the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide on 8 July 1949 but did not legislate to make genocide a crime in Australia until 2002. This article addresses the question as to why there was such a delay. It finds that at first the sticking point was constitutional uncertainty regarding the use of the external affairs power where the detail of the implementing legislation needs to differ from the terms of the obligations Australia has assumed by… Expand
Ireland and the genocide convention: an unhurried move to accede (1948-1976)
Brian Simpson argued that any general explanation for why states accede to international humanitarian treaties can only be valuable if based empirical case studies. His meticulous study of theExpand
Re-examining Australia’s hidden genocide: the removal of Aboriginal children in Australia as an act of cultural genocide
The 1997 Bringing Them Home Inquiry (BTHI) sparked a significant shift in public understanding of the Stolen Generations. While substantial evidence incriminated the Australian government with actsExpand

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Prosecuting War Crimes and Genocide: The Twentieth-Century Experience
The "ethnic cleansing" that has gripped the Balkans for much of this decade is but another chapter in the long history of man's inhumanity to man. Hopeful but unflinching in the face of suchExpand
Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody
Between 1 January 1980 and 31 May 1989, ninety-nine Aboriginal and Tones Strait Islander people died in the custody of prison, police or juvenile detention institutions. They were eighty-eight malesExpand