Why was Darwin’s view of species rejected by twentieth century biologists?

@article{Mallet2010WhyWD,
  title={Why was Darwin’s view of species rejected by twentieth century biologists?},
  author={James Mallet},
  journal={Biology \& Philosophy},
  year={2010},
  volume={25},
  pages={497-527}
}
  • J. Mallet
  • Published 1 May 2010
  • Biology
  • Biology & Philosophy
Historians and philosophers of science agree that Darwin had an understanding of species which led to a workable theory of their origins. To Darwin species did not differ essentially from ‘varieties’ within species, but were distinguishable in that they had developed gaps in formerly continuous morphological variation. Similar ideas can be defended today after updating them with modern population genetics. Why then, in the 1930s and 1940s, did Dobzhansky, Mayr and others argue that Darwin… 

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