Why the United States is becoming more vulnerable to natural disasters

@article{Vink1998WhyTU,
  title={Why the United States is becoming more vulnerable to natural disasters},
  author={G. Vink and R. M. Allen and J. Chapin and M. Crooks and W. Fraley and J. Krantz and A. Lavigne and A. L{\'e}cuyer and E. MacColl and W. Morgan and B. Ries and E. Robinson and K. Rodr{\'i}guez and M. A. Smith and K. Sponberg},
  journal={Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union},
  year={1998},
  volume={79},
  pages={533-537}
}
  • G. Vink, R. M. Allen, +12 authors K. Sponberg
  • Published 1998
  • Geography
  • Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
  • The United States is becoming more vulnerable to natural hazards mostly because of changes in population and national wealth density—more people and more societal infrastructure have become concentrated in disaster-prone areas. For most of the 20th century, the United States has been largely spared the expense of a catastrophic natural disaster. A great earthquake (magnitude 8 or larger) has not struck a major metropolitan area since the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. An extreme or catastrophic… CONTINUE READING
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