Why the Reward Structure of Science Makes Reproducibility Problems Inevitable

@article{Heesen2018WhyTR,
  title={Why the Reward Structure of Science Makes Reproducibility Problems Inevitable},
  author={Remco Heesen},
  journal={The Journal of Philosophy},
  year={2018},
  volume={115},
  pages={661-674}
}
  • R. Heesen
  • Published 1 December 2018
  • Philosophy
  • The Journal of Philosophy
Recent philosophical work has praised the reward structure of science, while recent empirical work has shown that many scientific results may not be reproducible. I argue that the reward structure of science incentivizes scientists to focus on speed and impact at the expense of the reproducibility of their work, thus contributing to the so-called reproducibility crisis. I use a rational choice model to identify a set of sufficient conditions for this problem to arise, and I argue that these… 

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