Why stream mayflies can reproduce without males but remain bisexual: a case of lost genetic variation

@inproceedings{Funk2010WhySM,
  title={Why stream mayflies can reproduce without males but remain bisexual: a case of lost genetic variation},
  author={D. Funk and B. Sweeney and J. K. Jackson},
  booktitle={Journal of the North American Benthological Society},
  year={2010}
}
  • D. Funk, B. Sweeney, J. K. Jackson
  • Published in
    Journal of the North American…
    2010
  • Biology
  • Abstract Mayflies (Ephemeroptera) are important to the food web of most stream, river, and lake ecosystems and are critical to water-quality monitoring programs. They are widespread and ancient (predate dinosaurs) and have primitive reproductive systems and the shortest adult life spans of all insects. Here we formulate and test the hypothesis that facultative parthenogenesis occurs as a widespread adaptation in most, if not all, mayflies. A rare form of reproduction, facultative… CONTINUE READING
    Chapter 34 – Order Ephemeroptera
    • 16
    Mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and Their Contributions to Ecosystem Services
    • 11
    • PDF

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