Why some rails have white tails: the evolution of white undertail plumage and anti-predator signaling

@article{Stang2008WhySR,
  title={Why some rails have white tails: the evolution of white undertail plumage and anti-predator signaling},
  author={A. T. Stang and S. McRae},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={23},
  pages={943-961}
}
  • A. T. Stang, S. McRae
  • Published 2008
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Ecology
  • Conspicuous plumage patches have evolved in birds as conspecific signals for mate attraction and assessment, intersexual competition or to signal alarm. Signals may alternatively be directed at potential predators to discourage pursuit. Rails (Family Rallidae) are ground-dwelling birds, many of which inhabit wetlands, while others occur in forests and grasslands. They are renown for their secretive nature and the tendency to flick their tails when observed. This behavior is more conspicuous in… CONTINUE READING

    Figures from this paper.

    Paper Mentions

    The fusion of behavioral ecology and ecology
    • 50
    • PDF
    Brain size and the expression of pheomelanin‐based colour in birds
    • 36
    • PDF
    Tail Movements in Birds—Current Evidence and New Concepts
    • 5
    Correlated Evolution of White Spots on Ears and Closed Habitat Preferences in Felids
    • 1
    • PDF

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 77 REFERENCES
    Sexual Selection
    • 6,718
    • PDF
    Behavioral decisions made under the risk of predation: a review and prospectus
    • 6,653
    • PDF
    The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex
    • 4,367
    • PDF
    Detecting correlated evolution on phylogenies: a general method for the comparative analysis of discrete characters
    • 1,387
    • Highly Influential
    Inferring the historical patterns of biological evolution
    • 3,124
    • PDF
    The Adaptive Significance of Coloration in Mammals
    • 311
    • PDF