Why pinnipeds don't echolocate.

@article{Schusterman2000WhyPD,
  title={Why pinnipeds don't echolocate.},
  author={Ronald J. Schusterman and David Kastak and David H. Levenson and Colleen Reichmuth and Brandon L. Southall},
  journal={The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  year={2000},
  volume={107 4},
  pages={
          2256-64
        }
}
Odontocete cetaceans have evolved a highly advanced system of active biosonar. It has been hypothesized that other groups of marine animals, such as the pinnipeds, possess analogous sound production, reception, and processing mechanisms that allow for underwater orientation using active echolocation. Despite sporadic investigation over the past 30 years, the accumulated evidence in favor of the pinniped echolocation hypothesis is unconvincing. We argue that an advanced echolocation system is… Expand
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