Why mob? Reassessing the costs and benefits of primate predator harassment.

@article{Crofoot2012WhyMR,
  title={Why mob? Reassessing the costs and benefits of primate predator harassment.},
  author={Margaret Crofoot},
  journal={Folia primatologica; international journal of primatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={83 3-6},
  pages={252-73}
}
While some primate species attempt to avoid predators by fleeing, hiding or producing alarm calls, others actually approach, harass and sometimes attack potential threats, a behavior known as 'mobbing'. Why individuals risk their safety to mob potential predators remains poorly understood. Here, I review reports of predator harassment by primates to (1) determine the distribution of this behavior across taxa, (2) assess what is known about the costs of mobbing, and (3) evaluate hypotheses about… CONTINUE READING

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