Why is Son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India and the Republic of Korea

@article{DasGupta2003WhyIS,
  title={Why is Son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India and the Republic of Korea},
  author={Monica Das Gupta and Ji Zhenghua and Liu Bohua and Xie Zhenming and Woojin Chung and Bae Hwa-Ok},
  journal={The Journal of Development Studies},
  year={2003},
  volume={40},
  pages={153 - 187}
}
Son preference has persisted in the face of sweeping economic and social changes in the countries studied here. We attribute this persistence to their similar family systems, which generate strong disincentives to raise daughters – whether or not their marriages require dowries – while valuing adult women's contributions to the household. Urbanisation, female education and employment can only slowly change these incentives without more direct efforts by the state and civil society to increase… 
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