Why hunter-gatherers work: An ancient version of the problem of public goods.

@article{Hawkes1993WhyHW,
  title={Why hunter-gatherers work: An ancient version of the problem of public goods.},
  author={Kristen Hawkes},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={1993},
  volume={34},
  pages={341-361}
}
  • Kristen Hawkes
  • Published 1993
  • Sociology
  • Current Anthropology
  • People who hunt and gather for a living share some resources more widely than others. A favored hypothesis to explain the dif­ ferential sharing is that giving up portions of large, unpredictable resources obligates others to return shares of them later, reduc­ ing everyone's variance in consumption. I show that this insur­ ance argument is not empirically supported for !Kung, Ache, and Hadza foragers. An alternative hypothesis is that the cost of not sharing these resources is too high to pay… CONTINUE READING

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