Why does the bioluminescent fungus Armillaria mellea have luminous mycelium but nonluminous fruiting body?

Abstract

By determining the components involved in the bioluminescence process in luminous and nonluminous organs of the honey fungus Armillaria mellea, we have established causes of partial luminescence of this fungus. The complete set of enzymes and substrates required for bioluminescence is formed only in the mycelium and only under the conditions of free oxygen access. Since the synthesis of luciferin precursor (hispidin) and 3-hydroxyhispidin hydroxylase in the fruiting bodies is blocked, the formation of luciferin—the key component of fungal bioluminescent system—was not observed. That is why the fruiting body of Armillaria mellea is nonluminous despite the presence of luciferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin with a photon emission.

DOI: 10.1134/S1607672917030176

Cite this paper

@article{Purtov2017WhyDT, title={Why does the bioluminescent fungus Armillaria mellea have luminous mycelium but nonluminous fruiting body?}, author={Konstantin V Purtov and Valentin N. Petushkov and Natalja S Rodionova and Joseph I Gitelson}, journal={Doklady Biochemistry and Biophysics}, year={2017}, volume={474}, pages={217-219} }