Why does Venus lack a magnetic field

@article{Nimmo2002WhyDV,
  title={Why does Venus lack a magnetic field},
  author={F. Nimmo},
  journal={Geology},
  year={2002},
  volume={30},
  pages={987-990}
}
  • F. Nimmo
  • Published 2002
  • Geology
  • Geology
  • Venus and Earth have similar radii and estimated bulk compositions, and both have an iron core that is at least partially liquid. However, despite these similarities, Venus lacks an appreciable dipolar magnetic field. Here I examine the hypothesis that this absence is due to Venus9s also lacking plate tectonics for the past 0.5 b.y. The generation of a global magnetic field requires core convection, which in turn requires extraction of heat from the core into the overlying mantle. Plate… CONTINUE READING
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