Why do some therapists not deal with outcome monitoring feedback? A feasibility study on the effect of regulatory focus and person-organization fit on attitude and outcome.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Despite research on its effectiveness, many therapists still have negative attitudes toward using outcome monitoring feedback. The current study aims to investigate how the perceived match between values of an individual and those of the organization (Person-Organization fit; PO fit), and motivation to prevent failure or to achieve success (regulatory focus) are related to therapists' attitude, attitude changes over time, and outcomes. METHOD Therapists (n = 20) filled out a feedback attitude questionnaire at two points in time: before the start of outcome monitoring, and after six months. In addition, they completed measures on PO fit and regulatory focus. RESULTS PO fit was predictive of outcomes, when feedback was provided, but did not predict therapists' attitude. Therapists with a strong prevention focus (prevent failures), had a more positive attitude toward feedback, but achieved slower symptom reduction in their at risk cases. A strong promotion focus (achieve success) was not predictive of attitude, but did result in faster symptom reduction in at risk patients when feedback was provided. CONCLUSION Therapists motivational approach to work and the perceived match with the organization they work for, can influence both their attitude toward outcome monitoring and their outcomes.

DOI: 10.1080/10503307.2015.1076198

Cite this paper

@article{Jong2015WhyDS, title={Why do some therapists not deal with outcome monitoring feedback? A feasibility study on the effect of regulatory focus and person-organization fit on attitude and outcome.}, author={Kim de Jong and Marije de Goede}, journal={Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research}, year={2015}, volume={25 6}, pages={661-8} }