Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?

@article{Alatalo1982WhyDP,
  title={Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?},
  author={R. Alatalo and A. Lundberg and Karin St{\aa}hlbrandt},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1982},
  volume={30},
  pages={585-593}
}
Abstract The contribution of the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca male in parental care was studied to examine why some females mate with already-mated males. No difference in feeding rate was found between older and yearling monogamous males, when comparing nests at the same time. Monogamous and primary females were helped significantly more in parental care by the male than were secondary females of polygynous males. Females could only partly compensate for the absence of a male and of… Expand
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  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2006
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It was revealed that direct reproductive success, i.e. number of fledglings, was lower in females that mated with bigynous males, especially in secondary broods without male assistance, than in females in the pied flycatcher that mates with monogamous males. Expand
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TLDR
A modified version of the polygyny threshold model that takes female aggression into account is presented and shows that secondary females generally have a reduced reproductive success compared with simultaneous, monogamous females. Expand
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TLDR
A second test based on the between-year dispersal tendencies of adult females and their presumed mating 'decisions' revealed a central role of site-tenacity in female choice, with variation in a secondary sexual character, the male's white patch in the forehead, also being important for pairing success. Expand
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It is contention that, in the "battle between the sexes," the male sex is relatively victorious in the pied flycatcher as compared with most altricial bird species which are strictly or almost strictly monogamous. Expand
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