Why do men marry and why do they stray?

@article{Winking2007WhyDM,
  title={Why do men marry and why do they stray?},
  author={Jeffrey Winking and Hillard S. Kaplan and Michael D. Gurven and Stacey L Rucas},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={274},
  pages={1643 - 1649}
}
Humans are quite unusual compared to other great apes in that reproduction typically takes place within long-term, iteroparous pairings—social arrangements that have been culturally reified as the institution of marriage. With respect to male behaviour, explanations of marriage fall into two major schools of thought. One holds that marriage facilitates a sexual division of labour and paternal investment, both important to the rearing of offspring that are born helpless and remain dependent for… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

The Unusual Women of Mpimbwe: Why Sex Differences in Humans are not Universal
TLDR
Analysis of reproductive strategies in a rural forager-horticultural population in western Tanzania where variance in women’s reproductive success is not significantly different from that of men and where women use serial matings rather more effectively than do men to outcompete their competitors is summarized.
Sex difference in travel is concentrated in adolescence and tracks reproductive interests
TLDR
It is found that sex differences in travel peak during adolescence when men and women are most intensively searching for mates, and that men's and women's travel behaviour reflects differential gains from mate search and parenting across the life course.
Choosy But Not Chaste: Multiple Mating in Human Females
  • B. Scelza
  • Biology, Psychology
    Evolutionary anthropology
  • 2013
TLDR
In brief, this work is best known for illuminating the typically male strategy of intrasexual competition and the typically female response of intersexual choice.
Are men really that bad as fathers? The role of men's investments
TLDR
It is argued that the record is better explained by conceptualizing reproduction within unions as a joint venture, in which men's contributions are not simply lumped onto women's invariant levels of parental investment, but one in whichMen's involvement allows wives to reduce their own allocations to parental investment and increase those to fertility (fertility model), thereby maximizing the production of the union.
The Fitness Effects of Men’s Family Investments
TLDR
Novel research is presented that explores all three pathways of father involvement within the same population, the Mayangna/Miskito horticulturalists of Nicaragua, and expands the traditional dichotomous measure of father presence/absence by using a continuous measure of overall male investment.
Sexual conflict in humans: Variations and solutions
Growing interest in sexual conflict since the late 1980s reflects several developments within behavioral ecology. These include recognition of females as active participants in co‐evolutionary
Why Do Men Hunt?
TLDR
It is shown that there is little empirical support for the view that men hunt for signaling benefits alone, and a framework incorporating trade‐offs between mating and subsistence strategies in an economic bargaining context is presented that contributes to understanding men’s and women's roles in hunter‐gatherer societies.
The goals of direct paternal care among a South Amerindian population.
TLDR
Overall, it is found that Tsimane men appear responsive to the needs of children and the family, but show that there is little evidence that men respond to factors expected to increase the impact that men's care has on their reputations with their wives.
A Bargaining Approach to Marriage and the Sexual Division of Labor For : Human Nature
Children may be viewed as public goods where both parents equally benefit genetically yet one parent often pays a greater cost and invests more heavily than the other. Investment decisions by
A Bioeconomic Approach to Marriage and the Sexual Division of Labor
TLDR
A microeconomic framework for understanding household investment decisions to address questions concerning conflicts of interest over types and amount of work effort among married men and women is introduced.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES
The male's dilemma: Increased offspring production is more paternity to steal
TLDR
The consequences of partitioning mating effort into mate guarding and all other forms of mating conflict are considered, finding that mating has much stronger effects than parenting in shaping male strategies.
Managing Infidelity: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Anthropologists have not systematically examined extramarital affairs. Our cross-cultural study found that within every culture men and women actively resort to mate-guarding tactics to control their
Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures
  • D. Buss
  • Psychology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • 1989
Abstract Contemporary mate preferences can provide important clues to human reproductive history. Little is known about which characteristics people value in potential mates. Five predictions were
Sexual Alliances: Evidence and Evolutionary Implications
TLDR
Mating serves more than a procreative function, and much more than gametes are exchanged between partners, and it is a factor to consider in explaining patterns of female mate choice and the evolution of a diversity of animal mating systems.
Evolution of human serial pairbonding.
  • H. Fisher
  • Psychology
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1989
TLDR
It is proposed that the above four-year modal marriage duration among couples of reproductive age who divorce reflects a hominid reproductive strategy that probably evolved some time after the appearance of Homo in response to increased female "reproductive burden" and functioned to ensure the survival of thehominid infant through weaning.
Hunting and Nuclear Families: Some Lessons from the Hadza about Men's Work
Hadza hunter-gatherers display economic and social features usually assumed to indicate the dependence of wives and children on provisioning husbands and fathers. The wives and children of better
Changes in women's sexual interests and their partner's mate–retention tactics across the menstrual cycle: evidence for shifting conflicts of interest
TLDR
Results showed that women reported greater sexual interest in, and fantasy about, non–primary partners near ovulation than during the luteal phase; but women did not report significantly greater sexualinterest in, or fantasies about, primary partners close to ovulation.
Hunting and Nuclear Families
Hadza hunter-gatherers display economic and social features usually assumed to indicate the dependence of wives and children on provisioning husbands and fathers. The wives and children of better
Susceptibility to Infidelity in the First Year of Marriage
Abstract Infidelity is a major cause of divorce and spousal battering. Little is known, however, about which individuals are susceptible to infidelity, or about the relationship contexts that promote
...
1
2
3
4
5
...