Why do female adders copulate so frequently?

@article{Madsen1992WhyDF,
  title={Why do female adders copulate so frequently?},
  author={T. Madsen and R. Shine and J. Loman and T. H{\aa}kansson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1992},
  volume={355},
  pages={440-441}
}
MALES of most animal species will enhance their reproductive success if they mate often and with many different partners, whereas promiscuous mating is unlikely to increase a female's reproductive success. Why then is multiple copulation by females so common1–6? Many theoreticians have suggested that multiple copulations might enhance the viability of a female's offspring, either because of inadequate quantities of sperm from the first mating1,7, additional nutrients derived from the seminal… Expand
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