Why do children learn to say “Broke”? A model of learning the past tense without feedback

@article{Taatgen2002WhyDC,
  title={Why do children learn to say “Broke”? A model of learning the past tense without feedback},
  author={Niels A Taatgen and John R. Anderson},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2002},
  volume={86},
  pages={123-155}
}
Learning the English past tense is characterized by a U-shaped learning function for the irregular verbs. Existing cognitive models often rely on a sudden increase in vocabulary, a high token-frequency of regular verbs, and complicated schemes of feedback in order to model this phenomenon. All these assumptions are at odds with empirical data. In this paper a hybrid ACT-R model is presented that shows U-shaped learning without direct feedback, changes in vocabulary, or unrealistically high… CONTINUE READING

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