Why coelacanths are not ‘living fossils’

@article{Casane2013WhyCA,
  title={Why coelacanths are not ‘living fossils’},
  author={Didier Casane and Patrick Laurenti},
  journal={BioEssays},
  year={2013},
  volume={35}
}
A series of recent studies on extant coelacanths has emphasised the slow rate of molecular and morphological evolution in these species. These studies were based on the assumption that a coelacanth is a ‘living fossil’ that has shown little morphological change since the Devonian, and they proposed a causal link between low molecular evolutionary rate and morphological stasis. Here, we have examined the available molecular and morphological data and show that: (i) low intra‐specific molecular… Expand

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