Why children learn color and size words so differently: evidence from adults' learning of artificial terms.

@article{Sandhofer2001WhyCL,
  title={Why children learn color and size words so differently: evidence from adults' learning of artificial terms.},
  author={Catherine M. Sandhofer and L B Smith},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={2001},
  volume={130 4},
  pages={
          600-20
        }
}
  • C. Sandhofer, L. Smith
  • Published 1 December 2001
  • Psychology
  • Journal of experimental psychology. General
An adult simulation study examined why children's learning of color and size terms follow different developmental patterns, one in which word comprehension precedes success in nonlinguistic matching tasks versus one in which matching precedes word comprehension. In 4 experiments, adults learned artificial labels for values on novel dimensions. Training mimicked that characteristic for children learning either color words or size words. The results suggest that the learning trajectories arise… 
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