Why are there so many tiny sperm? Sperm competition and the maintenance of two sexes.

@article{Parker1982WhyAT,
  title={Why are there so many tiny sperm? Sperm competition and the maintenance of two sexes.},
  author={Geoffrey Alan Parker},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={1982},
  volume={96 2},
  pages={
          281-94
        }
}
  • G. Parker
  • Published 21 May 1982
  • Biology
  • Journal of theoretical biology

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...

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