Why are larvae of the social parasite wasp Polistes sulcifer not removed from the host nest?

@article{Cervo2008WhyAL,
  title={Why are larvae of the social parasite wasp Polistes sulcifer not removed from the host nest?},
  author={Rita Cervo and Francesca Romana Dani and Chiara Cotoneschi and Clea Scala and Ing. Patrizia Lotti and Joan E. Strassmann and David C. Queller and Stefano Turillazzi},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={1319-1331}
}
A challenge for parasites is how to evade the sophisticated detection and rejection abilities of potential hosts. Many studies have shown how insect social parasites overcome host recognition systems and successfully enter host colonies. However, once a social parasite has successfully usurped an alien nest, its brood still face the challenge of avoiding host recognition. How immature stages of parasites fool the hosts has been little studied in social insects, though this has been deeply… Expand

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