Why are hairy root clusters so abundant in the most nutrient-impoverished soils of Australia?

@article{Lamont2004WhyAH,
  title={Why are hairy root clusters so abundant in the most nutrient-impoverished soils of Australia?},
  author={B. Lamont},
  journal={Plant and Soil},
  year={2004},
  volume={155-156},
  pages={269-272}
}
  • B. Lamont
  • Published 2004
  • Plant and Soil
  • Rootlets, covered in long root hairs, are aggregated into distinct clusters in many groups of Australian plants. They are almost universal in the family Proteaceae, and some members of the Papilionaceae, Mimosaceae, Casuarinaceae, Cyperaceae, Restionaceae and Dasypogonaceae. These families have their centres of distribution in the oldest, most leached sands and laterites of the continent. Root clusters are almost confined to the uppermost 100 mm of the soil profile, often penetrating into the… CONTINUE READING
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