Why are Immigrants&Apos; Incarceration Rates so Low? Evidence on Selective Immigration, Deterrence, and Deportation

@article{Butcher2007WhyAI,
  title={Why are Immigrants\&Apos; Incarceration Rates so Low? Evidence on Selective Immigration, Deterrence, and Deportation},
  author={Kristin F. Butcher and Anne Morrison Piehl},
  journal={NBER Working Paper Series},
  year={2007}
}
The perception that immigration adversely affects crime rates led to legislation in the 1990s that particularly increased punishment of criminal aliens. In fact, immigrants have much lower institutionalization (incarceration) rates than the native born - on the order of one-fifth the rate of natives. More recently arrived immigrants have the lowest relative incarceration rates, and this difference increased from 1980 to 2000. We examine whether the improvement in immigrants' relative… Expand
What Does Immigration Have to Do with It?
Few issues are as contentious as immigration and crime. Concern over the effects of immigration on crime is longstanding, and bans against criminal aliens constituted some of the earliestExpand
Immigration Status and Criminal Violence: How Much More Dangerous are Natives than Immigrants?
The theory of immigration links migratory movements with seeking better standards of living, but could immigration be linked with people seeking the occasion to get involved in illegal activities? IfExpand
Effects of Immigrant Legalization on Crime: The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act
In the late 1970's, rates of undocumented immigration into the United States increased dra- matically. This increase led to pressure on the federal government to nd some way of dealing with theExpand
The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States
For more than a century, innumerable studies have confirmed two simple yet powerful truths about the relationship between immigration and crime: immigrants are less likely to commit serious crimes orExpand
Immigration and Crime in Early 20th Century America
Research on crime in the late 20th century has consistently shown that immigrants have lower rates of involvement in criminal activity than natives. We find that a century ago immigrants may haveExpand
Is Immigration Responsible for the Crime Drop? An Assessment of the Influence of Immigration on Changes in Violent Crime Between 1990 and 2000
The idea that immigration increases crime rates has historically occupied an important role in criminological theory and has been central to the public and political discourses and debates onExpand
Immigration, crime, and incarceration in early twentieth-century america
TLDR
The time series pattern reflects a growing gap between natives and immigrants at older ages, one that was driven by sharp increases in the commitment rates of the native-born, while commitment rates for the foreign-born were remarkably stable. Expand
Exploring the Connection between Immigration and Crime Rates in U.S. Cities, 1980-2000
A popular perception is that immigration causes higher crime rates. Yet, historical and contemporary research finds that at the individual level, immigrants are not more inclined to commit crime thanExpand
Exploring the Connection between Immigration and Violent Crime Rates in U.S. Cities, 1980–2000
A popular perception is that immigration causes higher crime rates. Yet, historical and contemporary research finds that at the individual level, immigrants are not more inclined to commit crime thanExpand
Immigration and crime and the criminalization of immigration
Historically in the United States, periods of large-scale immigration have been accompanied by perceptions of threat and stereotypes of the feared criminality of immigrants. A century ago majorExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 42 REFERENCES
Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration
This analysis of data from the 5% 1980 and 1990 Public Use Microdata Samples shows that among 18–40-year-old men in the United States, immigrants were less likely than the native-born to beExpand
The Role of Deportation in the Incarceration of Immigrants
Using data on all new admissions to California state prisons in 1986, 1990, and 1996, we find that the foreign born have a very different offense mix from native-born inmates, with foreigners muchExpand
Sociological Criminology and the Mythology of Hispanic Immigration and Crime
Our sociological knowledge of crime is fragmented and ineffective in challenging and correcting mistaken public perceptions, for example, linking immigration and crime. These misperceptions areExpand
Does Immigration Increase Homicide? Negative Evidence From Three Border Cities
Understanding the complex relationship between immigration and crime was once a core concern of American sociology. Yet the extensive post-1965 wave of immigration to the United States has doneExpand
Cross-city evidence on the relationship between immigration and crime
Public concerns about the costs of immigration and crime are high, and sometimes overlapping. This article investigates the relationship between immigration into a metropolitan area and that area'sExpand
Use of Means-Tested Transfer Programs by Immigrants, Their Children, and Their Children's Children
Public concern over immigrants' use of welfare culminated in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (Welfare Reform Act (WRA)). Welfare reform radically changedExpand
The new Americans: economic demographic and fiscal effects of immigration.
This report was prepared by the National Research Councils Panel on the Demographic and Economic Impacts of Immigration and concerns the economic demographic and fiscal effects of immigration to theExpand
Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census
We use data from the 2000 Mexican Census to examine how the education and socioeconomic status of Mexican immigrants to the United States compares to that of non-migrants in Mexico. Our primaryExpand
Black Immigrants in the United States: A Comparison with Native Blacks and other Immigrants
This analysis of 1980 Census data shows that in 1979 immigrant black men had higher employment rates than native-born black men, but the wages of employed members of the two groups were nearly theExpand
Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants
  • G. Borjas
  • Economics
  • Journal of Labor Economics
  • 1985
This paper reexamines the empirical basis for two "facts" that seem to be found in most cross-section studies of immigrant earnings: (1) the earnings of immigrants grow rapidly as they assimilateExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...