Why adult mayflies of Cloeon dipterum (Ephemeroptera:Baetidae) become smaller as temperature warms

@article{Sweeney2018WhyAM,
  title={Why adult mayflies of Cloeon dipterum (Ephemeroptera:Baetidae) become smaller as temperature warms},
  author={B. W. Sweeney and D. H. Funk and A. Camp and D. Buchwalter and J. Jackson},
  journal={Freshwater Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={37},
  pages={64 - 81}
}
AbstractWe reared Cloeon dipterum from egg hatch to adult at 10 constant temperatures (12.1–33.5°C) to test 3 hypotheses (thermal equilibrium hypothesis, temperature size rule [TSR], and O2- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance [OCLTT]) that account for variation in life-history traits across thermal gradients. [...] Key Result Male and female adult size declined ~67 and 78% and larval development time declined ~88% with warming; chronic survivorship (thermal limit for population growth) was highest from 16.2…Expand
Growth rates of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) reared in the field differed under contrasting temperatures
Aquatic insect growth is tightly linked to environmental temperature. Growth rate tends to increase with rising temperatures. Growth rate integrates different factors related to population fitness,Expand
Why some mayfly adults are older and larger: Photoperiodic induction of larval quiescence
TLDR
It is proposed that the adaptive significance of larval quiescence includes the avoidance of low reproductive success likely to be experienced by adults emerging in the fall and might contribute to the seasonal variability observed in adult size and fecundity for both univoltines and multivoltine species. Expand
Phenological modeling of the parthenogenetic mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in White Clay Creek
TLDR
A three-stage stochastic individual-based model for the phenology of the parthenogenetic mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer predicts a multivoltine life cycle with a mode of 3 generations per year that agrees well with field observations and an optimally timed quiescent period for larvae is shown to enhance synchronization of adult emergence. Expand
Warming erodes individual‐level variability in life history responses to predation risk in larvae of the mayfly Cloeon dipterum
TLDR
Investigating how warming and non-consumptive predation risk influence life history responses in the larvae of the mayflyCloeon dipterum, an aquatic insect with highly plastic development, suggests that warming can synchronise population dynamics and consequently make such populations more vulnerable to unpredictable disturbances. Expand
Population dynamics and resting egg production in Daphnia: Interactive effects of mercury, population density and temperature.
TLDR
Findings show that depending on environmental conditions, rates of sexual reproduction in D. magna may respond to metal exposure at lower concentrations than those impacting population growth during the asexual phase. Expand
Water temperature drives variability in salmonfly abundance, emergence timing, and body size
River Res Applic. 2019;1–10. Abstract Freshwater organisms are disproportionately impacted by climate change and human disturbance, resulting in shifts in species' distributions and life histories.Expand
The Good, the Bad, and the Lethal: Gene Expression and Metabolomics Reveal Physiological Mechanisms Underlying Chronic Thermal Effects in Mayfly Larvae (Neocloeon triangulifer)
Temperature dictates the performance of aquatic ectotherms. However, the physiological and biochemical processes that drive thermally-mediated life history patterns (and limits) remain poorlyExpand
Transcriptomic and life history responses of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer to chronic diel thermal challenge
TLDR
The chronically stressed population had reduced expression of transcripts related to ATP synthesis, mitochondrial electron chain functions, gluconeogenesis and glycolytic processes while transcripts associated with cell adhesion, synaptic vesicle transport, regulation of membrane potential and lipid biosynthesis increased. Expand
Are sulfate effects in the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer driven by the cost of ion regulation?
TLDR
Evaluating the performance of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer reared for its entire larval phase in a gradient of sulfate concentrations suggested that elevated SO4 imposes an energetic demand associated with maintaining homeostasis that is manifested primarily as reduced growth rates and associated developmental delays. Expand
Shredder Feeding and Growth Rates
TLDR
Application of the method has helped to identify opposing feeding strategies when exposed to food of contrasting quality: maximization of food intake and growth on high-quality litter or increased ingestion rates when feeding on a low-quality diet allowing constant growth. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Bioenergetic and developmental response of a mayfly to thermal variation 1
Egg development, growth, and emergence of Isonychia bicolor were observed in White Clay Creek (Pennsylvania) at ambient temperatures and in fluctuating experimental regimes with diel minima rangingExpand
Life History, Developmental Processes, and Energetics of the Burrowing Mayfly Dolania Americana
TLDR
Larval growth appeared continuous, although seasonal differences in the amount of growth were observed, and weight specific respiration rates for larvae were inversely related to larval size, but correlated positively with water temperature between 6 and 23°C. Expand
Ephemerella Mayflies of White Clay Creek: Bioenergetic and Ecological Relationships Among Six Coexisting Species
TLDR
It is suggested that competition between pairs of consubgeneric species may be reduced somewhat by having the relative abundance and body size, as well as resource requirements (i.e., biomass production), of each pair segregated temporally. Expand
POPULATION SYNCHRONY IN MAYFLIES: A PREDATOR SATIATION HYPOTHESIS
TLDR
It is hypotheses that predator satiation provides a better conceptual framework for assessing adult emergence patterns in mayflies and perhaps other aquatic insects and that synchronization should be developed best in species having short-lived adults that are spatially dispersed. Expand
Physiological responses to short-term thermal stress in mayfly (Neocloeon triangulifer) larvae in relation to upper thermal limits
TLDR
The results suggest that the chronic thermal limits of this species are likely not driven by oxygen limitation, but rather are determined by other factors, e.g. bioenergetics costs. Expand
How do organisms change size with changing temperature? The importance of reproductive method and ontogenetic timing
TLDR
Fundamental differences in the operation of the TSR are shown in unicellular and multicellular organisms, suggesting that a general physiological mechanism causing the T SR is unlikely and the value of analysing shifts in size through the life cycle and across generations is revealed. Expand
Temperature-size responses match latitudinal-size clines in arthropods, revealing critical differences between aquatic and terrestrial species.
TLDR
While body size decreases with warming and with decreasing latitude in multivoltine terrestrial arthropods, size increases on average in univoltines species, consistent with predictions from size vs. season-length trade-offs. Expand
Equal temperature–size responses of the sexes are widespread within arthropod species
TLDR
It is suggested that the same proportional T–S response may generally have equivalent fitness costs and benefits in both sexes, which contrasts with effects of juvenile density, and food quantity/quality, which commonly result in greater size plasticity in females, suggesting these variables have different adaptive effects on SSD. Expand
Seasonal time constraints do not explain exceptions to the temperature size rule in ectotherms
TLDR
It is concluded that time constraints do not account for any reported counter-TSR relationship and is suggested that gaps in the data and/or experimental design can explain the apparent exceptions. Expand
Geographic Analysis of Thermal Equilibria: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Effect of Natural and Modified Thermal Regimes on Aquatic Insect Communities
TLDR
It is suggested that an 'optimum' thermal regime exists where adult size and fecundity are maximized; temperature regimes warmer or cooler than the "optimum'' result in small and less fecund adults. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...