Why a Polysomnogram Should Become Part of the Diagnostic Evaluation of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

@article{GriggDamberger2006WhyAP,
  title={Why a Polysomnogram Should Become Part of the Diagnostic Evaluation of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack},
  author={M. Grigg‐Damberger},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={23},
  pages={21-38}
}
Summary: Neurologists need to recognize, diagnose, and treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Increasing medical evidence suggests that OSA is an independent risk factor for stroke and TIA. Stroke (or TIA) is more likely a cause, rather than a consequence, of OSA because PSG studies have shown: 1) apneas in stroke are typically obstructive, not central or Cheyne-Stokes in type; 2) apneas are just as frequent and severe in patients with… Expand
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