Why Women Hunt

@article{BliegeBird2008WhyWH,
  title={Why Women Hunt},
  author={Rebecca Bliege Bird and Douglas W. Bird},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2008},
  volume={49},
  pages={655 - 693}
}
An old anthropological theory ascribes gender differences in hunter‐gatherer subsistence to an economy of scale in household economic production: women pursue child‐care‐compatible tasks and men, of necessity, provision wives and offspring with hunted meat. This theory explains little about the division of labor among the Australian Martu, where women hunt extensively and gendered asymmetry in foraging decisions is linked to men’s and women’s different social strategies. Women hunt primarily… 
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The results suggest that production inequalities among Martu emerge from stochastic variation in men’s foraging success on large prey measured against the backdrop of women‘s consistent production of small, low-variance resources.
Group Structure and Female Cooperative Networks in Australia’s Western Desert
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It is proposed that task specialization between female kin might also play an important role in women’s social and economic strategies and the maintenance of female kin networks across the lifespan allows for the possibility of cooperative breeding as well as an all-female division of labor.
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Gurven and Hill (2009) ask, “Why do men hunt?” As they say, “The observation that men hunt and women gather supported the simplistic view of marriage as a cooperative enterprise. Greater
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How resources vary in their expected daily energetic returns and in the variance or risk around those returns is examined to suggest that men's and women's foraging interests converge when high- energy resources can be reliably acquired, but diverge when higher-energy resources are associated with higher levels of risk.
Biological constraints and socioecological influences on women's pursuit of risk and the sexual division of labour
Abstract Abstract Evolutionary treatments of women's work and the sexual division of labour derive from sexual selection theory and focus on an observed cross-cultural trend: tasks performed by women
The Sexual Division of Labor
Many evolutionary arguments fossilize a human division of labor as one of man the hunter, and woman the gatherer, with differences in labor arising out of the effectiveness of efficiency. We suggest
Why Wage Earners Hunt: Food Sharing, Social Structure, and Influence in an Arctic Mixed Economy
Food sharing has been a central focus of research in human behavioral ecology and anthropology more broadly. Studies of food sharing have typically focused on either the individual’s motivations to
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