Why Teachers Adopt a Controlling Motivating Style Toward Students and How They Can Become More Autonomy Supportive

@article{Reeve2009WhyTA,
  title={Why Teachers Adopt a Controlling Motivating Style Toward Students and How They Can Become More Autonomy Supportive},
  author={Johnmarshall Reeve},
  journal={Educational Psychologist},
  year={2009},
  volume={44},
  pages={159 - 175}
}
  • J. Reeve
  • Published 22 July 2009
  • Education
  • Educational Psychologist
A recurring paradox in the contemporary K-12 classroom is that, although students educationally and developmentally benefit when teachers support their autonomy, teachers are often controlling during instruction. To understand and remedy this paradox, the article pursues three goals. First, the article characterizes the controlling style by defining it, articulating the conditions under which it is most likely to occur, linking it to poor student outcomes, explaining why it undermines these… 

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