Why Susie sells seashells by the seashore: implicit egotism and major life decisions.

@article{Pelham2002WhySS,
  title={Why Susie sells seashells by the seashore: implicit egotism and major life decisions.},
  author={Brett W Pelham and Matthew C. Mirenberg and John T Jones},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={82 4},
  pages={
          469-87
        }
}
Because most people possess positive associations about themselves, most people prefer things that are connected to the self (e.g., the letters in one's name). The authors refer to such preferences as implicit egotism. Ten studies assessed the role of implicit egotism in 2 major life decisions: where people choose to live and what people choose to do for a living. Studies 1-5 showed that people are disproportionately likely to live in places whose names resemble their own first or last names (e… Expand
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I sell seashells by the seashore and my name is Jack: comment on Pelham, Mirenberg, and Jones (2002).
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 2003
TLDR
New analyses of the original data are reported, showing that the hypothesis that people gravitate toward cities, states, and careers with names similar to their own names is not supported for the large majority of names considered, and for some names even the opposite result is found. Expand
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Abstract Research on “implicit egotism” indicates that people tend to react positively to anything that reminds them of themselves, including their own names and the letters in their names. Names canExpand
I Sell Seashells by the Seashore and My Name is Jack: A Critical Look at Pelham, Mirenberg, and Jones's (2002) Findings
According to a new hypothesis based on implicit egotism, people gravitate toward cities, states, and careers with names similar to their own names. To support this hypothesis, Pelham, Mirenberg, andExpand
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It is shown that people are disproportionately likely to marry others whose first or last names resemble their own, and that participants were more attracted to people whose arbitrary experimental code numbers resembled their own birthday numbers. Expand
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This research examines how the implicit egotism resulting from consumers’ positive self-associations affects their evaluations of product prices. The effects can occur when the product's price andExpand
Moniker Maladies
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Findings provide striking evidence that unconsciously desiring negative name-resembling performance outcomes can insidiously undermine the more conscious pursuit of positive outcomes. Expand
On the nature of implicit self-esteem: The case of the name letter effect.
In 1811, Napoleon (whose armies occupied The Netherlands) ruled that all Dutch citizens should have their family names registered. At the time of Napoleon's decree, family names were used only byExpand
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