Why More Americans Have No Religious Preference: Politics and Generations

@article{Hout2002WhyMA,
  title={Why More Americans Have No Religious Preference: Politics and Generations},
  author={M. Hout and C. Fischer},
  journal={American Sociological Review},
  year={2002},
  volume={67},
  pages={165-190}
}
The proportion of Americans who reported no religious preference doubled from 7 percent to 14 percent in the 1990s. This dramatic change may have resulted from demographic shifts, increasing religious skepticism, or the mix of politics and religion that characterized the 1990s. One demographic factor is the succession of generations; the percentage of adults who had been raised with no religion increased from 2 percent to 6 percent. Delayed marriage and parenthood also contributed to the… Expand

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