Why Is Broca'S Area Involved in Syntax?

@article{Caplan2006WhyIB,
  title={Why Is Broca'S Area Involved in Syntax?},
  author={David N. Caplan},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2006},
  volume={42},
  pages={469-471}
}
  • D. Caplan
  • Published 31 December 2006
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Cortex
Role of Broca's area in motor cognition
TLDR
The results converge to the view that Broca’s area is crucially involved in learning and processing structured sequences whatever their type: abstract or more ecological (action sequences), motor or cognitive, and thus emphasize its role as a possible “supramodal syntactic processor”.
Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Syntactic Processing in Sentence Comprehension: A Critical Selective Review
  • D. Caplan
  • Psychology
    Lang. Linguistics Compass
  • 2007
This article critically reviews recent papers that use functional neuroimaging to localize syntactic representations, Universal Grammar, parsing operations, and the working memory system that
Language processing in the occipital cortex of congenitally blind adults
TLDR
It is found that in congenitally blind individuals, the left visual cortex behaves similarly to classic language regions and is concluded that brain regions that are thought to have evolved for vision can take on language processing as a result of early experience.
Towards an Understanding of Language Origins
TLDR
It is plausible that genes changed in evolution so as to render the human brain more proficient in linguistic processing, and an Evolutionary Neurogenetic Algorithm (ENGA) is reviewed that holds promise that the authors shall ultimately understand how genes can rig the development of cognitively specialised neuronal networks.
Involvement of prefrontal cortex in scalar implicatures: evidence from magnetoencephalography
TLDR
The middle portion of the lateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 46) showed an increased response to some in contexts with fewer cues to the inference, suggesting that this condition elicited greater effort.
The neural correlates of agrammatism: Evidence from aphasic and healthy speakers performing an overt picture description task
TLDR
The results revealed that the investigation of the neural correlates of agrammatic language production can be reasonably conducted with an overt language production paradigm.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
The neurology of syntax: Language use without Broca's area
  • Y. Grodzinsky
  • Biology, Psychology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • 2000
TLDR
Five empirical arguments are presented: experiments in sentence comprehension, cross-linguistic considerations, grammaticality and plausibility judgments, real-time processing of complex sentences, and rehabilitation, which indicate that language is a distinct, modularly organized neurological entity.
Brain Activation Modulated by Sentence Comprehension
TLDR
The comprehension of visually presented sentences produces brain activation that increases with the linguistic complexity of the sentence, and the amount of neural activity that a given cognitive process engenders is dependent on the computational demand that the task imposes.
Language within our grasp
The Neural Reality of Syntactic Transformations
TLDR
The functional anatomy of syntactic transformations, a major computational operation invoked in sentence processing, was identified through a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation and a grammaticality judgment task presented through a novel hidden-blocks design revealed that the neural processing of transformations is localizable.
Localization of Syntactic Comprehension by Positron Emission Tomography
Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used to determine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) when eight normal right-handed males read and made acceptability judgments about sentences. rCBF was
Vascular responses to syntactic processing: Event‐related fMRI study of relative clauses
TLDR
This study shows that a hemodynamic response associated with processing the syntactically complex portions of a sentence can be localized to one part of the dominant perisylvian association cortex.
Language and the brain : representation and processing
Contributors. Preface. In Dedication to Edgar Basil Zurif. Architecture of the Language System: R. Jackendoff, Fodorian Modularity and Representational Modularity. M. Garrett, Remarks on the
Higher Cortical Functions in Man
TLDR
Among the authors' patients was a bookkeeper with a severe form of sensory aphasia who could still draw up the annual balance sheet in spite of severe disturbances of speech and although he was unable to remember the names of his subordinates and used to refer to them incorrectly.
No evidence for traces in sentence comprehension
Grodzinsky claims that “normal language users demonstrate trace-antecedent relations in real-time tasks.” However, the cited evidence is equally compatible with a traceless account of processing.
...
1
2
3
...