Why Have the Peninsular “Negritos” Remained Distinct?

@inproceedings{Benjamin2013WhyHT,
  title={Why Have the Peninsular “Negritos” Remained Distinct?},
  author={Geoffrey Benjamin},
  booktitle={Human biology},
  year={2013}
}
Abstract The primary focus of this article is on the so-called negritos of Peninsular Malaysia and southern Thailand, but attention is also paid to other parts of Southeast Asia. I present a survey of current views on the “negrito” phenotype—is it single or many? If the phenotype is many (as now seems likely), it must have resulted from parallel evolution in the several different regions where it has been claimed to exist. This would suggest (contrary to certain views that have been expressed… Expand
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