Why Do Calypte Hummingbirds “Sing” with Both Their Tail and Their Syrinx? An Apparent Example of Sexual Sensory Bias

@article{Clark2009WhyDC,
  title={Why Do Calypte Hummingbirds “Sing” with Both Their Tail and Their Syrinx? An Apparent Example of Sexual Sensory Bias},
  author={C. J. Clark and Teresa J. Feo},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2009},
  volume={175},
  pages={27 - 37}
}
Courtship displays frequently include complex signals that females use to pick a mate. Male Costa’s hummingbirds (Calypte costae) generate two acoustic signals during courtship: a vocal song produced close to a female and a dive‐sound produced during a courtship dive. The song and dive‐sound sound similar, and both were assumed to be produced vocally by the syrinx. Here, we show that they are not; whereas the song is produced by the syrinx, the dive‐sound is produced by high‐frequency… Expand
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