Why Democracies Cooperate More: Electoral Control and International Trade Agreements

@article{Mansfield2002WhyDC,
  title={Why Democracies Cooperate More: Electoral Control and International Trade Agreements},
  author={Edwin Mansfield and Edward Milner and Edward D. Helen V. B. Peter Rosendorff},
  journal={International Organization},
  year={2002},
  volume={56},
  pages={477 - 513}
}
Over the past fifty years, barriers to international trade have decreased substantially. A key source of this decline in protectionism has been the proliferation of agreements among countries to liberalize commerce. In this article, we analyze the domestic political conditions under which states have concluded such agreements and, more generally, explore the factors affecting interstate economic cooperation. We argue that interstate cooperation on commercial issues depends heavily on the… Expand
The Domestic Politics of Preferential Trade Agreements in Hard Times
Abstract There is evidence that some countries negotiate trade agreements during economic downturns. Why would a leader do this? We argue that political leaders can gain from such agreements becauseExpand
Free to Trade: Democracies, Autocracies, and International Trade
Relatively little research has focused on whether countries' political institutions affect their international trade relations. We address this issue by analyzing the relationship between regime typeExpand
Domestic Institutions and the Ratification of International Agreements in a Panel of Democracies
A recent literature explores how domestic institutions affect politicians’ incentives to enter into international agreements (IAs). We contribute to this field by systematically testing the impact ofExpand
Free to Trade: Democracies, Autocracies, and International Trade
Relatively little research has focused on whether countries' political institutions affect their international trade relations. We address this issue by analyzing the relationship between regime typeExpand
The Coevolution of Trade Agreement Networks and Democracy
The proliferation of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) and the wave of democratization are among the most significant developments in international relations during the past three decades. TheExpand
Economic Liberalism in Illiberal Regimes: Authoritarian Variation and the Political Economy of Trade
Over the last few decades, a vast literature has emerged examining the relationship between democratic political institutions and trade policy outcomes. While this literature has added significantlyExpand
Democratization and Trade Policy: An Empirical Analysis of Developing Countries
I show that the process of democratization in developing countries constitutes an important factor in the formation of preferential trade agreements. Specifically, democratizing developing countriesExpand
Democratization and trade policy: An empirical analysis of developing countries
I show that the process of democratization in developing countries constitutes an important factor in the formation of preferential trade agreements. Specifically, democratizing developing countriesExpand
Why Do Democracies Exit International Agreements? The Role of Information in International Cooperation on Climate Change
In December 2011, the Canadian government decided to officially withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol on climate change. While this decision has been expected by some negotiators and policy-makers, itExpand
Strategic choices of bilateral and multilateral preferential trade agreements: empirical analysis
Abstract The rapid proliferation of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) has prompted numerous studies on why states seek PTAs. However, very little research examines why states vary in choosingExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 156 REFERENCES
Free to Trade: Democracies, Autocracies, and International Trade
Relatively little research has focused on whether countries' political institutions affect their international trade relations. We address this issue by analyzing the relationship between regime typeExpand
Democratic Convergence and Free Trade
Even if a democracy were more likely to pursue free trade than an autocracy (an unproven generalization), the simultaneous spread of democracy in the world would not necessarily yield a reduction inExpand
The Classical Liberals Were Right: Democracy, Interdependence, and Conflict, 1950–1985
The liberals believed that economic interdependence, as well as democracy, would reduce the incidence of interstate conflict. In this article, we test both their economic and their politicalExpand
POWER POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Recent literature attributes the relative scarcity of open international markets to the prisoner's dilemma structure of state preferences with respect to trade. We argue that the prisoner's dilemmaExpand
An Institutional Explanation of the Democratic Peace
We examine formally the link between domestic political institutions and policy choices in the context of eight empirical regularities that constitute the democratic peace. We demonstrate thatExpand
The Political Economy of International Relations.
After the end of World War II, the United States, by far the dominant economic and military power at that time, joined with the surviving capitalist democracies to create an unprecedentedExpand
Economic Discrimination and Political Exchange: World Political Economy in the 1930s and 1980s
Did bilateral and regional bargaining choke off international commerce and finance in the 1930s and prolong the Great Depression? And is the open world economic system now being placed at risk byExpand
Returns to Regionalism: An Evaluation of Nontraditional Gains from Regional Trade Agreements
Is there more to regional trade agreements than the traditional gains from trade? The past decade has witnessed an explosion in the number of regional trade agreements. There seems to be a general,Expand
Cooperation and Governance in International Trade: The Strategic Organizational Approach
International trade liberalization historically has taken many organizational forms - unilateral, bilateral, minilateral, and multilateral. Given the proliferation of normative views about which ofExpand
New dimensions in regional integration: Regionalism and multilateralism: an overview
The question of ‘regionalism’, defined broadly as preferential trade agreements among a subset of nations, is a longstanding one. As with all great issues, economists have long been divided on theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...