Why Battered Women Do Not Leave, Part 2

@article{Barnett2001WhyBW,
  title={Why Battered Women Do Not Leave, Part 2},
  author={Ola W. Barnett},
  journal={Trauma, Violence, \& Abuse},
  year={2001},
  volume={2},
  pages={3 - 35}
}
  • O. Barnett
  • Published 2001
  • Psychology
  • Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
This article is Part 2 of a review of factors hindering battered women's chances of leaving violent relationships. Part 1 covered major external inhibiting factors (e.g., women's economic dependency and the shortcomings of the criminal justice system). Part 2 centers on additional external inhibiting factors, such as inadequate social support from workplaces and community agencies, and addresses internal inhibiting factors, including the processes and effects of socialization, psychological and… Expand
Intimate partner violence and the leaving process: Interviews with abused women
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global health problem. Previous studies show the complexity of a violent relationship and provide different explanations for the reasons why the woman do notExpand
Battered Women: Victims or Survivors?
Abstract From 1970, research into women’s responses to marital violence became much more intense than ever before. Academic literature emphasizes two explanatory perspectives: of the woman as passiveExpand
Applying Operant Learning to the Stay-Leave Decision in Domestic Violence
Research on domestic violence has identified many factors behind an abused woman’s decision to stay in, rather than leave, the relationship, including economic concerns, psychological issues, andExpand
Immigrant mothers in abusive relationships: Decisions and actions
of a dissertation at the University of Miami. Intimate partner violence is an important public health concern affecting millions of mothers and their children each year. Research suggests that LatinaExpand
Battered Women's Decision After Intimate Partner Violence
Battered women’s reasons for staying with or leaving their male partners are varied and complex. Using data from the Domestic Violence Experience in Omaha, Nebraska, a discrete-time hazard model wasExpand
Falling for the Ones That Were Abusive: Cycles of Violence in Low-Income Women’s Intimate Relationships
TLDR
A qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with 24 low-income women living in Eastern Washington State illustrates the complexity of abusive interpersonal relationships, and the decision-making processes that abused women utilize to escape violence. Expand
Factors Influencing Intimate Partner Violence against Men in Lusaka, Zambia
TLDR
The common forms of violence found were physical, verbal, sexual and psychological, and physical injuries, emotional problems financial difficulties and HIV/AIDS were the negative outcomes of female-induced violence. Expand
Rethinking Social Support and Conflict: Lessons from a Study of Women Who Have Separated from Abusive Partners
TLDR
It is found that the severity of past IPV exerted direct negative effects on women's health and the use of strategies to help women enhance support and reduce conflict in their relationships are essential aspects of nursing care. Expand
The Effect of Multiple Types of Intimate Partner Violence on Maternal Criminal Justice Involvement
TLDR
Evidence is found that mothers who have experienced any abuse type are at greater risk of criminal justice involvement and the need for criminal justice actors to take intimate partner violence into account when they are making decisions that impact women is pointed to. Expand
Women Leaving Violent Men: Crossroads of Emotion, Cognition and Action
This thesis addresses battered women’s leaving processes. Leaving is conceptualised in a wider sense, i.e. as disentanglement from violent relationships beyond the physical break-up. The general aimExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 276 REFERENCES
Coping with domestic violence: Social support and psychological health among battered women
TLDR
Results indicated that increased levels of violence, minimal personal resources, lack of institutional and informal social support, and greater avoidant coping styles were related to lowered self-esteem and more severe depressive symptoms. Expand
Women's experiences of abuse: a review of qualitative research.
  • M. Sleutel
  • Medicine
  • Issues in mental health nursing
  • 1998
TLDR
Qualitative research based on women's first person accounts of their abuse experiences, including abuse in pregnancy, women who fight back, substance use, sex after beatings, family origins, and women who are elderly, minority, or from other cultures are reviewed. Expand
The Relationship Between Violence, Social Support, and Self-Blame in Battered Women
This study hypothesized that battered women compared with nonbattered women use more violence, receive lower levels of social support, and experience higher levels of self-blame. Also hypothesized isExpand
Restraining Orders: A Frequent Marker of Adverse Maternal Health
TLDR
Differences on maternal health and child behavior between women who report filing a restraining order (RO) and those who do not among a nonreferred sample of women living in high-crime neighborhoods are identified. Expand
Predictors of Depression in Battered Women
TLDR
The findings from this study suggest that physical abuse is an important part of the etiology of depression in battered women and that the abuse in combination with daily hassles supports a stress explanation of depression, with a woman's ability to take care of herself a protective factor. Expand
EFFECTIVE INTERVENTION IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CASES: RETHINKING THE ROLES OF PROSECUTORS, JUDGES, AND THE COURT SYSTEM
Despite over two decades of reform, fundamental failures persist in the justice system's response to domestic violence. Society now widely accepts elimination of intrafamily abuse as a crucial goal,Expand
Battered woman syndrome: a critical review.
TLDR
A critical review of accumulated research and conceptual issues regarding Battered Woman Syndrome (BWS) finds that battered women may experience stages of abuse where the manifestations of BWS are part of the steps to conflict resolution. Expand
Women's reasons for leaving abusive spouses.
  • Y. Ulrich
  • Medicine
  • Health care for women international
  • 1991
TLDR
Self-report retrospective data from a nonrandom sample limit generalizability of results; however, the awareness and reasoning of the women, coupled with their emphasis on leaving as process and personal growth, suggest the importance of education and support programs for abused women and women at risk for abuse. Expand
Post-Shelter Services: The Efficacy of Follow-Up Programs for Abused Women
TLDR
The majority of the women perceived the programs as central in their not returning to an abusive relationship, and their amount of appraisal support improved, although tangible and belonging support and perceived stress levels did not change significantly. Expand
Physician interaction with battered women: the women's perspective.
TLDR
Battered women are surveyed to rate the desirability of specific physician behaviors and identify discrete sets of desirable and undesirable physician behaviors that can help guide both clinical practice and the development of physician training curricula. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...