Why Are Women Diagnosed Borderline More Than Men?

@article{Skodol2004WhyAW,
  title={Why Are Women Diagnosed Borderline More Than Men?},
  author={Andrew E. Skodol and Donna S Bender},
  journal={Psychiatric Quarterly},
  year={2004},
  volume={74},
  pages={349-360}
}
DSM-IV-TR states that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is “diagnosed predominantly (about 75%) in females.” A 3:1 female to male gender ratio is quite pronounced for a mental disorder and, consequently, has led to speculation about its cause and to some empirical research. The essential question is whether the higher rate of BPD observed in women is a result of a sampling or diagnostic bias, or is it a reflection of biological or sociocultural differences between women and men? Data to… 
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