Whose Finger on the Trigger? Mixed Anti-Aircraft Batteries and the Female Combat Taboo

@article{Degroot1997WhoseFO,
  title={Whose Finger on the Trigger? Mixed Anti-Aircraft Batteries and the Female Combat Taboo},
  author={Gerard J. Degroot},
  journal={War in History},
  year={1997},
  volume={4},
  pages={434 - 453}
}
U ntil recently, most industrialized societies have held to the sacred tenet that women should not engage in combat. They might work as typists, nurses or drivers in the military; they might make shells in munitions factories; but they should not actually fight. The female combat taboo was a widely accepted benchmark of civilization. The British, who considered themselves the most civilized people on earth, were particularly sensitive to the moral pitfalls of women in combat. In a July 1940… 
Combatant or Non-Combatant? The Ambiguous Status of Women in British Anti-Aircraft Batteries during the Second World War
War, at least in the modern period, puts considerable strain on established notions of femininity and masculinity as being clearly marked off from each other by involvement in warfare. This became
From Buzuluk to London: The Combat Trail and Everyday Service of Women Auxiliaries in the Polish Army (1941–1945)
This article explores the establishment of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary Service (was) as part of the complex story of the formation of a Polish army in exile. In 1941, after the German invasion of
The integration of women into the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force, post-World War II to the mid-1990s
The history of women in Britain's armed forces is dominated by wartime participation and, latterly, explanations of wider employment of servicewomen in the 1990s. Women's service is mainly attributed
Women Inside the Canadian Military, 1938-1966
This dissertation inserts servicewomen into military history and women’s and gender history by analyzing how women voiced their place in the Canadian military between 1938 and 1966. It studies how
Combat Role for Women in the Indian Armed Forces
Introduction: The woman is participating in the every field with the men in the modern age. In the armed forces also women is performing different duties. The current study will evaluate the role of
Women in the firing line: the home guard and the defence of gender boundaries in Britain in the second world war
Abstract The Home Guard is well known as a local volunteer force formed to protect Britain against invasion in 1940. Less familiar is the history of the gendering of the organisation. Although the
Turning a Pretty Girl into a Killer’: Women, Violence and Clandestine Operations during the Second World War
Nancy Wake, a clandestine agent who during the Second World War worked with the French Resistance, asserted, ‘I hate wars and violence but if they come then I don’t see why we women should just wave
Less than we can be: Men, women and the modern military
From the beginning of history, war has been an almost exclusively male affair and those who took part in it were often extolled as the most manliest of men. The recent feminization of the armed
Less than we can be: Men, women and the modern military
From the beginning of history, war has been an almost exclusively male affair and those who took part in it were often extolled as the most manliest of men. The recent feminization of the armed
What Makes a Norm Robust: The Norm Against Female Combat
The norm against female combat participation has been powerfully influential and extremely slow to change, despite a record of violation and concerted attempts by states to overturn it. As a result,
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
personal memoir, Imperial War Museum ref
    Vera Robinson taped interview
      Just Like William
      • 1995
      To her great regret, the woman in question was prevented on health grounds from being posted to a gunnery unit
        Mollie Ritson interview with the author 12 Sept
        • 1995
        Women Who Went to War