Who was James Lind, and what exactly did he achieve

@article{Milne2012WhoWJ,
  title={Who was James Lind, and what exactly did he achieve},
  author={Iain A. Milne},
  journal={Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine},
  year={2012},
  volume={105},
  pages={503 - 508}
}
  • I. Milne
  • Published 1 December 2012
  • History, Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Visitors to the Edinburgh University quadrangle in Teviot Place, which used to house the Medical School, are unlikely to miss the large plaque put up in 1955 by the Sunkist Growers of Citrus Fruit in California and Arizona. The plaque suggests that James Lind is The Hippocrates of Naval Medicine. It then lists three of his four books ‘A treatise of the scurvy’ , ‘An essay on the most effectual means of preserving the health of seamen’, and ‘An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans in hot… Expand
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References

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TLDR
James Lind remained Chief Physician for 25 years, and was succeeded by his son John in 1783, and is reputed to have advised Sir Edward Hawke, who was commanding the Fleet blockading the French port of Brest, of the importance of fresh vegetables and fruit. Expand
James Lind (1716-94) of Edinburgh and the treatment of scurvy
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The Lind family moved to Edinburgh from Ayrshire in the 16th century. James Lind (senior) married Margaret Smellum in 1707 and they had a daughter, Joan, nine years before their son James was born onExpand
Documenting the evidence: the case of scurvy.
Iain Milne & Iain Chalmers look at how James Lind's 1753 ground-breaking paper entitled "A treatise of the scurvy" helped to change the public health policy of his day and, in turn, improve publicExpand
George Chalmers’ portrait of James Lind, 1783-2008: a reconstruction
TLDR
The James Lind Library, which contains biographical details about Sir George Chalmers, Lind's portraitist, researched by John Chalmers. Expand
Lind and scurvy: 1747 to 1795.
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  • Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
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Lind’s Treatise of the Scurvy1 is a good illustration of the basis for mid-18th century judgement and decision-making in at least two respects: it quotes the contributions of others at length, andExpand
James Lind and the cure of scurvy: an experimental approach.
TLDR
James Lind presented a balanced and carefully reasoned assessment of contemporary ideas regarding the origin, nature and cure of scurvy. Expand
Limeys: The True Story of One Man's War Against Ignorance, the Establishment and the Deadly Scurvy
TLDR
This work is the history of Dr James Lind's efforts to find a cure for scurvy in the face of prejudice and political and establishment antipathy. Expand
Putrid gums and 'dead men's cloaths'.
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Sailors' scurvy before and after James Lind--a reassessment.
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In recent decades revisionist historians have challenged normative accounts, including that of scurvy, and the historicity of Lind's trial, so it is timely to reassess systematically the strengths and weaknesses of the canonical saga. Expand
James Lind’s Treatise of the Scurvy (1753)
TLDR
It is argued that the modern understanding of scurvy and vitamin C has hindered the understanding of Lind’s own conception of his work and of the place within it of his clinical trials. Expand
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