Who should receive recruitment and retention incentives? Improved targeting of rural doctors using medical workforce data.

@article{Humphreys2012WhoSR,
  title={Who should receive recruitment and retention incentives? Improved targeting of rural doctors using medical workforce data.},
  author={John Stirling Humphreys and Matthew Richard McGrail and Catherine M Joyce and Anthony Scott and Guyonne Kalb},
  journal={The Australian journal of rural health},
  year={2012},
  volume={20 1},
  pages={
          3-10
        }
}
OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to define an improved classification for allocating incentives to support the recruitment and retention of doctors in rural Australia. DESIGN AND SETTING Geo-coded data (n = 3636 general practitioners (GPs)) from the national Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life study were used to examine statistical variation in four professional indicators (total hours worked, public hospital work, on call after-hours and difficulty taking time off… Expand
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