Who reviews for predatory journals? A study on reviewer characteristics

@article{Severin2020WhoRF,
  title={Who reviews for predatory journals? A study on reviewer characteristics},
  author={Anna Severin and Michaela Strinzel and Matthias Egger and Marc Domingo and Tiago Barros},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
Background While the characteristics of scholars who publish in predatory journals are relatively well-understood, nothing is known about the scholars who review for these journals. We aimed to answer the following questions: Can we observe patterns of reviewer characteristics for scholars who review for predatory journals and for legitimate journals? Second, how are reviews for potentially predatory journals distributed globally? Methods We matched random samples of 1,000 predatory journals… 

Are negative reviews, predatory reviewers or failed peer review rewarded at Publons?

Dear International Orthopaedics Editors, At Publons, which is owned by ClarivateTM Analytics, peer reviewers gain credit for having conducted peer review, i.e. a peer reviewer’s “quality” is measured

Avoiding publishing in predatory journals: An evaluation algorithm

Academics and scholars need to publish their research results. In addition, they are required to publish scientific papers to prove their research commitment and to achieve certain academic titles in

How reliable and useful is Cabell's Blacklist ? A data-driven analysis

TLDR
Cabell's blacklist was tested to analyse whether or not it could be adopted as a reliable tool by stakeholders in scholarly communication, including its own academic library, and to make recommendations and suggestions that could help improve Cabel's blacklist service.

Hundreds of scientists have peer-reviewed for predatory journals

TLDR
The quality of reviews in these titles has been in question for some time; some of these titles have some editorial oversight — but the quality of review is in question.

Hundreds of scientists have peer-reviewed for predatory journals

Many of these titles have some editorial oversight — but the quality of reviews is in question. Many of these titles have some editorial oversight — but the quality of reviews is in question.

The odd couple: contrasting openness in innovation and science

TLDR
This essay engages critically with recent calls for a close coupling of the two domains based on their apparent commonality: openness, and finds substantial differences between open innovation and open science.

Don't judge a journal by its cover?: Appearance of a Journal's website as predictor of blacklisted Open‐Access status

TLDR
A convolutional neural network is used to predict whether a journal is whitelisted based on a screenshot of its website and shows that appearance is indeed a predictive factor, achieving a medium performance.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES

How Frequently are Articles in Predatory Open Access Journals Cited

TLDR
It is concluded that articles published in predatory journals have little scientific impact.

Who publishes in “predatory” journals?

TLDR
It is believed that economic and sociocultural conditions in these developing countries have contributed to the differences found in authorship between “predatory” and “nonpredatory" journals.

What is a predatory journal? A scoping review.

TLDR
The objective of this scoping review is to summarize the literature on predatory journals, describe its epidemiological characteristics, and to extract empirical descriptions of potential characteristics of predatory journals.

What is a predatory journal? A scoping review

TLDR
The objective of this scoping review is to summarize the literature on predatory journals, describe its epidemiological characteristics, and to extract empirical descriptions of potential characteristics of predatory journals.

Readers beware! Predatory journals are infiltrating citation databases

TLDR
C Citation databases are contaminated with publications of questionable quality originating from so-called predatory journals, and the integrity and usefulness of citation databases, on which the authors rely as sources of trustworthy research, are now being called in question.

Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison

TLDR
13 evidence-based characteristics by which predatory journals may potentially be distinguished from presumed legitimate journals are identified may be useful for authors who are assessing journals for possible submission or for others, such as universities evaluating candidates’ publications as part of the hiring process.

‘Predatory’ open access: a longitudinal study of article volumes and market characteristics

TLDR
Despite a total number of journals and publishing volumes comparable to respectable open access journals, the problem of predatory open access seems highly contained to just a few countries, where the academic evaluation practices strongly favor international publication, but without further quality checks.

Blacklists and Whitelists To Tackle Predatory Publishing: a Cross-Sectional Comparison and Thematic Analysis

Predatory journals are spurious scientific outlets that charge fees for editorial and publishing services that they do not provide. Their lack of quality assurance of published articles increases the

Why do researchers decide to publish in questionable journals? A review of the literature

TLDR
An overview of the existing literature on why researchers decide to publish papers in questionable journals is provided, specifically whether or not they search for a low‐barrier way to getting published while being aware that the chosen journal probably does not adhere to acceptable academic standards.