Who is to blame? Neural correlates of causal attribution in social situations

@article{Seidel2010WhoIT,
  title={Who is to blame? Neural correlates of causal attribution in social situations},
  author={Eva-Maria Seidel and Simon B. Eickhoff and Thilo Kellermann and Frank Schneider and Ruben C. Gur and Ute Habel and Birgit Derntl},
  journal={Social Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={5},
  pages={335 - 350}
}
In everyday life causal attribution is important in order to structure the complex world, provide explanations for events and to understand why our environment interacts with us in a particular way. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 30 healthy subjects to separate the neural correlates of self vs. external responsibility for social events and explore the neural basis of self-serving attributions (internal attributions of positive events and external attributions of… Expand
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