Who caused the pain? An fMRI investigation of empathy and intentionality in children

@article{Decety2008WhoCT,
  title={Who caused the pain? An fMRI investigation of empathy and intentionality in children},
  author={Jean Decety and Kalina J Michalska and Yuko Akitsuki},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2008},
  volume={46},
  pages={2607-2614}
}
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The Neural Substrate of Human Empathy: Effects of Perspective-taking and Cognitive Appraisal
TLDR
The view that humans' responses to the pain of others can be modulated by cognitive and motivational processes, which influence whether observing a conspecific in need of help will result in empathic concern, an important instigator for helping behavior, is supported.
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