Who are you looking at? The influence of face gender on visual attention and memory for own- and other-race faces.

@article{Lovn2012WhoAY,
  title={Who are you looking at? The influence of face gender on visual attention and memory for own- and other-race faces.},
  author={Johanna Lov{\'e}n and Jenny Rehnman and Stefan Wiens and Torun Lindholm and Nathalie Peira and Agneta Herlitz},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2012},
  volume={20 4},
  pages={321-31}
}
Previous research suggests that the own-race bias (ORB) in memory for faces is a result of other-race faces receiving less visual attention at encoding. As women typically display an own-gender bias in memory for faces and men do not, we investigated whether face gender and sex of viewer influenced visual attention and memory for own- and other-race faces, and if preferential viewing of own-race faces contributed to the ORB in memory. Participants viewed pairs of female or male own- and other… CONTINUE READING

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