Who Won Libya? The Force-Diplomacy Debate and Its Implications for Theory and Policy

@article{Jentleson2006WhoWL,
  title={Who Won Libya? The Force-Diplomacy Debate and Its Implications for Theory and Policy},
  author={Bruce W. Jentleson and Christopher A. Whytock},
  journal={International Security},
  year={2006},
  volume={30},
  pages={47-86}
}
The debate over credit for Libya's shift away from rogue state policies, most especially by settling the Pan Am 103 Lockerbie terrorism case and abandoning its weapons of mass destruction (WMD) programs, is lively politically and challenging analytically. It has important implications for theories of force and diplomacy, particularly coercive diplomacy, and policy debates including such cases as Iran and North Korea. U.S. coercive diplomacy against Libya can be divided into three phases: the… 
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