Who Should Own Scientific Papers?

@article{Bachrach1998WhoSO,
  title={Who Should Own Scientific Papers?},
  author={Steven M. Bachrach and R. Stephen Berry and Martin Blume and Thomas von Foerster and Alexander Fowler and Paul H. Ginsparg and Stephen Heller and Neil R. Kestner and Andrew Odlyzko and Ann Shumelda Okerson and Ron Wigington and Anne Simon Moffat},
  journal={Science},
  year={1998},
  volume={281},
  pages={1459 - 1460}
}
Electronic publication has changed the relationship between publisher and scientist. This Policy Forum argues, because Federally-supported science is a public good, that authors of works based on such support should retain copyright, and issue licenses to their publishers. 
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