Who Gets Covered? Ideological Extremity and News Coverage of Members of the U.S. Congress, 1993 to 2013

@article{Wagner2018WhoGC,
  title={Who Gets Covered? Ideological Extremity and News Coverage of Members of the U.S. Congress, 1993 to 2013},
  author={Michael W. Wagner and Michael W. Gruszczynski},
  journal={Journalism \& Mass Communication Quarterly},
  year={2018},
  volume={95},
  pages={670 - 690}
}
Does the news media cover ideological extremists more than moderates? We combine a measure of members of Congress’ ideological extremity with a content analysis of how often lawmakers appear in the New York Times from the 103rd to the 112th Congresses and on CBS and NBC’s evening newscasts in the 112th Congress. We show that ideological extremity is positively related to political news coverage for members of the House of Representatives. Generally, ideological extremity is not related to the… 

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