Who Gave You the Cauchy–Weierstrass Tale? The Dual History of Rigorous Calculus

@article{Borovik2012WhoGY,
  title={Who Gave You the Cauchy–Weierstrass Tale? The Dual History of Rigorous Calculus},
  author={Alexandre V. Borovik and Mikhail G. Katz},
  journal={Foundations of Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={17},
  pages={245-276}
}
Cauchy’s contribution to the foundations of analysis is often viewed through the lens of developments that occurred some decades later, namely the formalisation of analysis on the basis of the epsilon-delta doctrine in the context of an Archimedean continuum. What does one see if one refrains from viewing Cauchy as if he had read Weierstrass already? One sees, with Felix Klein, a parallel thread for the development of analysis, in the context of an infinitesimal-enriched continuum. One sees… 
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