Who Earns More and Why? A Multiple Mediation Model from Personality to Salary

@article{Spurk2011WhoEM,
  title={Who Earns More and Why? A Multiple Mediation Model from Personality to Salary},
  author={Daniel Spurk and A. Abele},
  journal={Journal of Business and Psychology},
  year={2011},
  volume={26},
  pages={87-103}
}
  • Daniel Spurk, A. Abele
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Business and Psychology
  • PurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate multiple indirect Big Five personality influences on professionals’ annual salary while considering relevant mediators. These are the motivational variables of occupational self-efficacy and career-advancement goals, and the work status variable of contractual work hours. The motivational and work status variables were conceptualized as serial mediators (Big Five → occupational self-efficacy/career-advancement goals → contractual work hours… CONTINUE READING
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