Who Do You Trust? The Consequences of Partisanship and Trust for Public Responsiveness to COVID-19 Orders

@article{Goldstein2021WhoDY,
  title={Who Do You Trust? The Consequences of Partisanship and Trust for Public Responsiveness to COVID-19 Orders},
  author={Dani Goldstein and Johannes Wiedemann},
  journal={Perspectives on Politics},
  year={2021},
  volume={20},
  pages={412 - 438}
}
Non-uniform compliance with public policy by citizens can undermine the effectiveness of government, particularly during crises. Mitigation policies intended to combat the novel coronavirus offer a real-world measure of citizen compliance, allowing us to examine the determinants of asymmetrical responsiveness. Analyzing county-level cellphone data, we leverage staggered roll-out to estimate the causal effect of stay-at-home orders on mobility using a difference-in-differences strategy. We find… 

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