Who Can Win a Single-Elimination Tournament?

@article{Kim2016WhoCW,
  title={Who Can Win a Single-Elimination Tournament?},
  author={Michael P. Kim and Warut Suksompong and Virginia Vassilevska Williams},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2016},
  volume={abs/1511.08416}
}
A single-elimination (SE) tournament is a popular way to select a winner in both sports competitions and in elections. A natural and well-studied question is the tournament fixing problem (TFP): given the set of all pairwise match outcomes, can a tournament organizer rig an SE tournament by adjusting the initial seeding so that their favorite player wins? We prove new sufficient conditions on the pairwise match outcome information and the favorite player, under which there is guaranteed to be a… 
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