Who Are We? The Challenges to America's National Identity

@article{Segura2005WhoAW,
  title={Who Are We? The Challenges to America's National Identity},
  author={Gary M. Segura},
  journal={Perspectives on Politics},
  year={2005},
  volume={3},
  pages={640 - 642}
}
  • Gary M. Segura
  • Published 26 August 2005
  • Sociology
  • Perspectives on Politics
Who Are We? The Challenges to America's National Identity. By Samuel P. Huntington. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2004. 448p. $27.00. Samuel Huntington suggests in this book that American national identity is threatened by a tidal wave of Latino—primarily Mexican—immigrants who are refusing to assimilate to American “Anglo-Protestant” values, and who are facilitated in this resistance by the erosion of elite support for those very same values. That erosion is a consequence of the “cults of… 

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  • Sociology
    Perspectives on Politics
  • 2006
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TLDR
Research suggesting that future Mexican-origin economic advancement is as likely to turn on the availability of structural opportunities as on cultural factors is reviewed, indicating that the integration of Mexican- origin persons into American society is progressing at a steady if not rapid pace.
...

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Who Are We?: The Challenges to America's National Identity

In his seminal work "The Clash of Civilizations" and the "Remaking of World Order," Samuel Huntington argued provocatively and presciently that with the end of the cold war, "civilizations" were

The Color-Blind Constitution

Introduction 1. A Glorious Liberty Document 2. The Lynn Petition 3. Sumner and Shaw 4. The Reconstruction Amendments of Wendell Phillips 5. The Thirty-Ninth Congress 6. The Judicial Assessment 7.